PRIVACY POLICY

We at Little Red Jacket.com take privacy of our visitors seriously and we wish to stress that we do not gather, save, collect nor use any personal information of visitors to our Website.

Email Policy
We do not collect, sell, rent, or otherwise distribute email addresses or any other personal information. We also do not solicit or collect any emails unless you make a request for reuse of our content or other general enquiry. All discussions by email or phone are completely confidential unless we obtain written consent from you.

Statistics
We may sometimes employ our own customised statistic analytics which uses tracking cookies which we use to identify, what country, what Internet protocol (IP) address and for methods on how you come to visit our site, including whether you came direct to our site or from another website and the URL of that website. We also try to identify if you have visited us from a search engine such as Google or Bing and for what search string you used. No data is shared or given to third parties.

Please Note
Our Privacy Policy is subject to change.
This policy was last updated 27th July 2012

FURTHER INFORMATION

What is a cookie?
Cookies are usually small text files, given ID tags that are stored on your computer's browser directory or program data subfolders. Cookies are created when you use your browser to visit a website that uses cookies to keep track of your movements within the site, help you resume where you left off, remember your registered login, theme selection, preferences, and other customization functions. The website stores a corresponding file(with same ID tag)to the one they set in your browser and in this file they can track and keep information on your movements within the site and any information you may have voluntarily given while visiting the website, such as email address.

Cookies are often indispensable for websites that have huge databases, need logins, have customizable themes, other advanced features. Cookies usually don't contain much information except for the url of the website that created the cookie, the duration of the cookie's abilities and effects, and a random number. Due to the little amount of information a cookie contains, it usually cannot be used to reveal your identity or personally identifying information. However, marketing is becoming increasingly sophisticated and cookies in some cases can be agressively used to create a profile of your surfing habits.

There are two types of cookies: session cookies and persistent cookies. Session cookies are created temporarily in your browser's subfolder while you are visiting a website. Once you leave the site, the session cookie is deleted. On the other hand, persistent cookie files remain in your browser's subfolder and are activated again once you visit the website that created that particular cookie. A persistent cookie remains in the browser's subfolder for the duration period set within the cookie's file.

What is an IP address?
The IP Address is a unique number assigned to your computer connection by your home or office or employer's Internet Service Provider (ISP). This unique number serves as the ID of your connection when it's accessing the Internet. It functions like your street address—if someone wants to send you mail or you order a pizza, your address is needed for the postman or delivery person to find your home. The same process applies to your computer, your IP address is used to route information from the Internet to your computer.

Depending on the type of ISP service agreement you have, the IP Address is assigned to your computer's connection on a provisional basis and usually changes whenever you reboot your router. An IP Address is a way to measure a user's unique identity. It is a number that is allocated to your browser by your Internet Service Provider (ISP) or employer, when you log on to the internet. It is usually allocated on a temporary (or dynamic) basis ie it is only allocated to your browser for the duration of that session online. It is the 'address' of your computer while you are online. Without an IP address, servers would not be able to deliver content to you, because they would not be able to locate your computer.

Uniform Resource Locator (URL)
A URL is technically a type of uniform resource identifier (URI) but in many technical documents and verbal discussions URL is often used as a synonym for URI. The Uniform Resource Locator was created in 1994 by Tim Berners-Lee and the URI working group of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) as an outcome of collaboration started at the IETF Living Documents "Birds of a Feather" session in 1992.The format combines the pre-existing system of domain names (created in 1985) with file path syntax, where forward slashes are used to separate folder and file names.




















































 

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